How does Julie Andrews escape Nazis with Active Learning?

How does Julie Andrews escape Nazis with Active Learning?

 
 
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The hills are aliiiiive with the sooooound of lectuuuuures. And that’s why Active Learning is so gosh darned important.

In this episode we’ll be answering the bloody stupid question, ‘How does Julie Andrews escape nazis with active learning?’. To do so we’ll look back to the veil of time to the pre-on demand media era, to the 1965 Rogers and Hammerstein classic ‘The Sound of Music’.

If you’re less than thirty years old and have no idea what it is, it’s that thing that’s been parodied a million times. Think doe-ray-me, getting buzzed by a helicopter on a mountain, and escaping from zer nazis by getting a standing ovation.

Active learning is an umbrella term for a load of stuff. You can find Olivia’s cracking article on the subject over here at the OU Learning Design blog.

If you enjoy the episode, then hit us up on the Twitters and let us know. If you didn’t enjoy the episode then I hear Joe Rogan is pretty popular.

Mailbox Magic – How do Ontology and Epistomology help you kill JarJar Binks with headcannons?

A photograph of much beloved Jar Jar Binks

Mailbox Magic – How do Ontology and Epistomology help you kill JarJar Binks with headcannons?

 
 
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This is a special mailbox episode, at the request of Scott R. Cowan who asked us to demystify Ontology, Epistomology, Positivism and Interpretivism. Not only will we lift the veil on the terms and show you how they fit together, but we’ll also give you the mental equipment you need to erase poorly written CG monsters from your sci-fi canon of choice.

‘Another Star Wars episode?!’ I hear you cry over the internet. Well pish and pertiddle I say, there’s so much learning and teaching in those movies (and they’re so ubiquitous that they make a great accessible schema to frame things against) that we could genuinely smash it against a pedagogy every single episode. We go against that base instinct for your sake though listeners, because we love you.

And because as geeks we’re at the buffet table of nerdism, as opposed to the set menu.

On that subject, we were infiltrated by a non-geek in this episode! We’re joined by Olivia who has a special interest in the subject, but has only ever seen one Star Wars movie. And it was one of the prequels. Egad.

Mark wrote a smashing blog on the subject of this episode. You can find it on his site here.

If you’ve got something you’re particularly interested in us covering in the old pedagogical world, then do let us know. You can hit us up via the twitters @pedagodzilla.

How does the Critical Digital Pedagogy help Starfleet boldly go where no one has gone before?

How does the Critical Digital Pedagogy help Starfleet boldly go where no one has gone before?

 
 
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This week Mike is joined by Liz Ellis as we look at Critical Digital Pedagogy through the lens of Starfleet, the Prime Directive, and the best (insert hate mail here) series of Star Trek.

Is Critical pedagogy a massive subject in itself? Would it have been more sensible to do a separate episode on that first and then the ‘digital’ bit as a followup? Did we forget to actually be critical of critical digital pedagogy? Yes, yes and yes.

Apols if the audio is a bit weird for this one. Editing software changed halfway through the edit on this, and still getting the hang of the new one!

If you enjoy it, or want to tell us how wrong we are about everything, you can get in touch @pedagodzilla on the twitters. Or send a subspace communication using space magic.

How does Arnie keep his skin attached using Situated Learning in Predator?

How does Arnie keep his skin attached using Situated Learning in Predator?

 
 
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This week we take a look at the continent (yes continent, I swear it will all make sense eventually) of Situated Learning, through the lens of 1987’s best film about aliens hunting Arnold Schwarzenegger – Predator.

We also discover that the studio is on fire, and that Mark’s caffeine tolerance is impressive but not unlimited.

This is another one of our trunk episodes sans branches, as it turns out there’s a whole heck of a lot going on in it! We’ll fill in those branches in time with stick and leaves and other wobbly metaphors.

If you enjoy it, or want to tell us how wrong we are about everything, you can get in touch @pedagodzilla on the twitters. We haven’t bitten anyone for days.

You can pick up Mark’s book, Making Sense of Space: The Design and Experience of Virtual Spaces as a Tool for Communication at https://www.amazon.co.uk/Making-Sense-Space-Communication-Professional-ebook/dp/B00M3Z1GMG/ 

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Does Neo really experience Experiential Learning in the Matrix?

Does Neo really experience Experiential Learning in the Matrix?

 
 
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This episode we take a look at the Experiential Learning model, through the lens of The Matrix.

It’s my new favorite learning model (simple, helix, practical) combined with one of the best films ever made (because Keanu Reeves), and to really ice the cake we finally sorted out the show format. Break down the question, answer it, bosh.

If you enjoy it, or want to tell us how wrong we are about everything, you can get in touch @pedagodzilla on the twitters.

How do you fight off Dementors using Constructive Alignment?

How do you fight off Dementors using Constructive Alignment?

 
 
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This week, Mike and Mark look at constructive alignment through the lens of Professor Remus Lupin’s marvelous defense against the dark arts curriculum. We also accidentally look at Meerkats, as it turns out they’re amazing teachers as well as being properly rock and roll.

This is going to be a bit of a trunk episode, so if you’d like to hear more about the main components then fret ye not! Smaller episodes on the individual bits are heading your way you lucky people.

Enjoy!

Cognitive load / The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy

Cognitive load / The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy

 
 
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This episode we answer the question – How does the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy help Arthur Dent take a cognitive load off?

To do so, we’ll pick apart our understanding of the concept of cognitive load, give some really bad examples of it, and then bang it against Douglas Adam’s accidental masterpiece until the microphone runs out of battery.

We’ll also give you the full definition of Sesquipedalian Obscurantism free of charge.

10 Principles of Instruction / Yoda the supply teacher

10 Principles of Instruction / Yoda the supply teacher

 
 
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This week, we’ll be reviewing Barak Rosenshine’s 10 principles of instruction and asking ourselves: was Yoda an effective supply teacher?

If you’ve never come across them before – Barak Rosenshine’s 10 principles are really popular in the US, so popular infact that he’s added a load more. We’ll unpack them, sense check them, give them a bit of a kicking, and then see if we can get them to apply to the best (or worst) supply teacher in the Star Wars universe.

Communities of practice / World of Warcraft

Communities of practice / World of Warcraft

 
 
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This episode, we’ll be pottering around in Lave and Wenger’s communities of practice model and asking ourselves, what does a boundary object have to do with Leeroy Jenkins?

Wait … did we even answer that in the episode? If we didn’t then here it is: the concept of Leeroy Jenkins is a boundary object that can pull you deeper within the community through a piece of shared history, an understanding of raid mechanics, and a cautionary tale.

You can grab the book we reference, “Learning in virtual worlds: Using communities of practice to explain how people learn from play” by Martin Oliver and Diane Carr at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1467-8535.2009.00948.x

This was one of the first episodes we recorded, so you may notice the title and format aren’t quite the same as later episodes. Sorry about that!